Sunday, November 25, 2012

Free Diaper Insert Pattern - One size fits most

There isn't any reason you should pay for a diaper insert pattern. In this free diaper soaker tutorial you will learn my FAVORITE way to make these. My diaper inserts hold approx up to 14 of fluid if you use the recommended fabrics. This pattern makes a 13" long insert so it is a great one to use for any size baby or diaper. However, if you choose to make this longer or shorter, it's SOO easy to adapt!

I recommend using a few different fabrics when making diaper inserts. You can use basically any fabric that has a 'soaking' capability, but some fabrics work better then others.
When you use my recommended fabrics for diaper inserts, you get a diaper insert AND a diaper soaker. A diaper insert is what you put inside a pocket diaper....this doesn't touch the babies skin. A diaper soaker is a 'lay in' type of soaker that typically goes against the baby's skin.
My recommended fabrics in this diaper insert pattern are Bamboo fleece, ZORB and Microterry. One side is a soft, moisture wicking bamboo fabric that gathers moisture yet still feels dry. This is an excellent fabric to keep against your baby's skin as a lay in soaker. The other side is a fast absorbing microfiber with a sandwiched ZORB layer. The opposite side of the insert has a very thirsty microfiber fabric. When you use this as an insert, it sucks up moisture faster then anything!
Finally, I use a ZORB layer in the center of the diaper insert. This not only makes the insert incredibly absorbent, but it also keeps the microfiber from having 'compression leaks'.
Compression leaks are what typically happens to inserts or soakers that are 100% microfiber. The microfiber is thirtsty and sucks up moisture fast, but it can't hold it when the baby "squishes" it by sitting on it. ZORB and bamboo hold fluid exceptionally well, which is why I chose to pair the two with the fast absorbing microfiber.
Check out this diaper insert pattern - it's free! It's my favorite and what I choose to use for my babies and what I recommend for my customers.
Not only that, but you can see how stinkin easy my patterns are by viewing it. :)

Friday, November 23, 2012

Postpartum Pad Pattern is ready!

I finally have the cloth postpartum pad pattern ready to use! It includes a waterproof shell, insert and AIO postpartum pad pattern (doubles as an overnight pad). There are gussets to keep the first week messes into place as well as an INCREDIBLY absorbent insert (a whopping 8 oz).
how to make a postpartum pad

After a woman has a baby (postpartum), she needs quite a bit more flow protection than normal. Not only is postpartum flow protection expensive, but most pads are not even practical for the “gush” that happens. By choosing reusable cloth postpartum pads, you will be saving your body against chemically infused materials, you will have a pad that is adequate to handle your flow postpartum, you will have a soft and comfortable pad against your sensitive skin AND you will save an incredible amount of money.
This postpartum pad pattern is a 3 part system to give you all the protection you need after having a baby. 


The Postpartum Pad Shell Pattern:

Postpartum pad pattern (shell) with gussets

This postpartum pad shell is designed to keep either disposable or cloth pads in place during the first week after a baby is born. This is the most 'messy' time for a new mom. During this time, you will find that the gussets of the shell keep the “gush” moments in place without fear of soiling clothing. There is a built in pocket for putting a baggy full of crushed ice, a snap for holding a cloth insert into place (if you choose to use cloth), and double snaps with three size settings for keeping the shell attached to your panties.
The postpartum pad shell is designed to be washed in the washing machine when soiled, however – you should get many pad changes out of one pad shell. Simply unsnap the insert if using cloth, or remove the disposable pad. Wipe the pad shell with toilet paper if there is anything on it and add a clean insert or pad. This saves time, cost to make and patience. 


The Postpartum Shell Insert Pattern:

This shell insert (the soaker) is to be used with a shell. It does not have a waterproof layer so it is important that it snaps into the shell to stay into place. If this insert is made with recommended fabrics it can hold up to 8 ounces of fluid – this absorbency is double then the leading disposable overnight maxi pads. The recommended soft fabric gives your sensitive skin a break from harsh disposable pads. 


The AIO (all in one) Postpartum Pad Pattern :

postpartum pad patternWhen the first week postpartum is over, blood flow slows down considerably. This is the time to switch to an 'overnight' pad. The AIO postpartum pad makes it easy to switch! 
The AIO postpartum pad has the absorbency and leakproofness built right in. It has wings that have  double snaps with three size settings for keeping the pad attached to your panties and in place. 
If you choose to use the recommended fabrics, the AIO postpartum pad will hold up to 4 oz of fluid. This is the same absorbency as the leading disposable brand, yet MUCH more soft and comfortable.
When your postpartum flow is over, simply use these pads for heavy days or overnight.


THIS POSTPARTUM PAD PATTERN & TUTORIAL INCLUDES


A tutorial for a postpartum shell pattern – use with cloth or disposable pads
  • Step by step directions with crisp, real life images for each step
  • Snapped wings with 3 size adjustments
  • Gussets
A tutorial for a postpartum shell insert pattern – perfect fit for the shell
  • Step by step directions with crisp, real life images for each step
  • Snap in insert stays in place
  • Holds 8 oz of fluid
A tutorial for the AIO postpartum pad pattern (also doubles as an overnight pad)
  • Step by step directions with crisp, real life images for each step
  • Snapped wings with 3 size adjustments
  • Holds 4 oz of fluid
Printable pattern pieces
  • Postpartum pad shell
  • Postpartum pad shell insert
  • AIO postpartum pad (overnight pad)
  • Gussets
Recommended fabrics 
Budget friendly fabric & notion ideas
Cutting charts to get the most out of fabric
Tips on how many pads to make
Tricks on how to sew recommended fabrics, using snaps & places to buy supplies for best prices
100% support from a professional seamstress



Want to check it out? Visit my website for the postpartum pad pattern!


Saturday, November 17, 2012

Postpartum Pad pattern coming up!

Postpartum Pad Pattern coming soon!

This postpartum pad pattern makes it easy and cheap to make your own soft, comfortable, and absorbent postpartum pads.
After countless hours of ideas, research and trials,  I have come up with a new idea - a new postpartum pad pattern. It will be available soon (hopefully next week) on my website, www.mammacandoit.com.



What is bleeding like after birth?

I'm not going to lie: it's terrible. Any period that you have ever had could not compare to what you are going to experience. The first 3 days are the worst, then it slows considerably. 
During the first 3 days it is not uncommon to soak the largest pad available upon standing. Because the vagina is actually shaped like a 'cup', blood pools up inside of a woman. When she stands, it is common to feel as if blood is pouring out of the vagina. Many times it will leak out of the sides of a pad and cause a huge mess.
After the first 3 days, the bleeding becomes slowed a bit, but is still comparable to your heaviest period ever. You will still need pads that have optimum soaking capability. 
In my experience, if I stay in bed for the first 7-10 days (torture) after birth, bleeding will be completely stopped by 3 weeks. However, I have also experienced "toughing it out" and not getting optimum rest...the bleeding did not stop until 8 weeks. 
Try your best to get someone to help you during that first two weeks so that you will not be handicap with bleeding, otherwise, be prepared for a murder scene in the bathroom for the first 2 months or so.

Why use cloth after birth?

-Not only is cloth a cost effective way to deal with postpartum (after birth) bleeding, but it is incredibly comfortable. Comfort in such an 'uncomfortable' time is the number one reason why anyone would use cloth.

-Did I mention cost effective? The typical cost of disposable postpartum protection is about $150-$200 depending on what products that you use and how long bleeding lasts. By using cloth, you can make your own postpartum pads for $30 or less....AND they'll be available for heavy period days as well as the next time you get pregnant.

-Stay dryer longer: My soaker (insert) pad that is included in this postpartum pad pattern holds up to 8 oz of fluid. To compare I tested an Always maxi overnight....but it only held 4 oz. That's double protection!

-The gussets are reason enough! Disposable pads don't have them....you absolutely can't go without gussets the first 3 days after birth.

-Disposable paper products have been shown to tear out stitches and it also does not absorb quite enough, fast enough the first few days. Thus you will encounter leaks. By using my suggested fabrics you will not encounter leaks because these are designed to readily soak up the quick postpartum flow.

-Disposable paper products have been treated with multiple chemicals - by using cloth, you will save your sensitive skin from being exposed to these harsh chemicals. 

-There are few, if any products available in supermarkets that are designed specifically for postpartum bleeding protection. By making your own postpartum pads, you will have unlimited access to products designed specifically for after birth mamas.



Postpartum Pad Pattern Features

This postpartum pad pattern is designed for convenient, cost effective, safe protection after a baby is born. It features a two part system: an outer, waterproof shell and a snap in super soft and absorbent soaker to keep you comfortable and dry.
This postpartum pad pattern has a wipeable, outer, waterproof shell. This not only saves on the cost to make these pads, but also will save time in the bathroom. Simply snap in an absorbent pad inside the shell and voila - safe and secure protection. The outside of the postpartum pad shell is a cute cotton print so you can feel feminine even in an uncomfortable time.
Don't worry about 'side leaks' - this postpartum pad pattern includes directions on how to make leakproof gussets. This is worth it's weight in GOLD the first 3 days after giving birth.

The postpartum pad pattern also has optional wings to snap the postpartum pad to panties so that you don't have to worry about shifting.
Ice packs are wonderful the first couple days to calm sore tissues, so this postpartum pad design has a pocket to place an icepack to keep you cool in sensitive areas.
The snap in soaker in this postpartum pad pattern design is designed to be absolutely wonderful. The fabrics that I suggest using will keep you feeling dry and pampered by how comfortable it is (so so soooo much better than disposables).
Among all of these features, I will also be including an "all in one" pad pattern and tutorial for after the heaviest flow (lochia) has slowed down. This pad will also double as a superior overnight pad or incontinence protection.

Also included in the postpartum pad pattern & tutorial will be printable pattern pieces, step by step images for each step, budget friendly fabric suggestions, helpful hints and tips and so much more!



Saturday, November 10, 2012

How to make bra extenders for free or cheap!

In this tutorial, I show you how to make bra extenders for free or super cheap. I needed a bra extender (pregnancy can be crazy on the clothes) and I figured out how to make one! Make one for free or for significantly less then store bought bra extenders.

Step 1. Determine what bras you need extenders for. How many hooks & eyes are on them? Usually it's 2 or 3. For this tutorial, I am using two.

Step 2. Go to your bra drawer and get out the bras that don't fit anymore. We all have them, don't lie to yourself. :) If you absolutely can't part with any, stop at your local thrift shop and pick out bras that have the same amount of hooks & eyes as the ones you need extenders for.

Step 3. Time to recycle that bra and make a bra extender! 

how to make a bra extender for free
Recycle an old bra into a bra extender!

Step 4. Cut off the hooks & eyes of bra as shown below. You want to leave a bit of room for sewing. If you sew onto a hook or eye, you'll damage your needle and/or machine.

how to make a bra extender for free
Cut off hooks & eyes of the soon to be 'bra extender'

Step 5. Place eyes facing up and the hooks facing down. 

how to make a bra extender for free
Line up the soon to be bra extender

Step 6. Sew the raw edges together. Use a zig zag stitch to 'seal them together'. Sew over and over and over the edges so that it will be secure and not irritate your skin.

how to make a bra extender for free
Sew up the bra extender with a zig zag stitch

how to make a bra extender for free
Another image (this took an entire 5 minutes to make btw)


Step 7. Attach to your bra and admire your handiwork!
how to sew a bra extender
5 minutes of my time to make my pregnant self more comfy?
Yes please!



Tuesday, November 6, 2012

Free Diaper Insert Pattern (template)

Cloth diaper inserts don't have to be expensive. Make your own diaper inserts and diaper soakers with this free diaper insert pattern! If you make your own diaper inserts for pocket cloth diapers, it will save you a ton of money!
free diaper insert pattern
I have had quite a few questions on what type of fabric to make inserts out of. I have tried quite a few and I am convinced that bamboo and zorb make the best inserts. Here is an article from my website that I wrote a while back regarding the best fabrics and types of inserts. 


Sew A One Size Fits All Cloth Diaper Insert (Soaker)

Before the tutorial on how to sew your own diaper insert, lets take a moment to look at the different types of inserts. Tri-folds, duo-folds, and no fold inserts are the ones that we recommend. Below you will find a list to help you understand what each of them are.
  • Tri-fold Insert
    • A type of diaper insert that is a large rectangle or square. To use, fold it into thirds to make the diaper soaker before stuffing into the diaper. Use this type for diaper covers, pockets, or for extra aborbency as a lay in inside the diaper (like for night time use). 
    • Tri-folds are a favorite for quick drying and super aborbency. 
    • The best fabric to use when making a tri-fold insert depends on how you are going to use the soaker.
      • For an every day soaker for a pocket diaper, use Zorb and Bamboo.
      • For an overnight soaker for a pocket diaper, use Zorb and Microterry or bamboo.
      • For an every day insert for a diaper cover, use zorb sandwiched between alova.
      • For an overnight soaker for a diaper cover, use zorb and microterry sandwiched between alova.
      • For extra aborbency as a lay in insert on a fitted or aio diaper, use flannel to sew a thinner diaper insert that will still absorb very well.
         
  • Duo-fold
    • A type of insert that is a large rectangle. You will fold it in half to make the diaper soaker before stuffing into the diaper. Use this type for diaper covers, pockets, or for extra aborbency as a lay in inside the diaper (like for night time use).
    • Duo-folds are handy because they dry quickly (although not as quickly as a tri-fold)
    • The best fabric to use when making a duo-fold insert depends on how you are going to use the soaker.  
      • For an every day soaker for a pocket diaper, use Zorb and bamboo.
      • For an overnight soaker for a pocket diaper, use Zorb and Microterry or bamboo.
      • For an every day insert for a diaper cover, use zorb sandwiched between alova.
      • For an overnight soaker for a diaper cover, use zorb and microterry sandwiched between alova.
      • For extra aborbency as a lay in insert on a fitted or aio diaper, use flannel to sew a thinner diaper insert that will still absorb very well.
  • No fold diaper insert
    • A no fold diaper insert is a 'pre-folded' insert. These are made for pocket diapers specifically. They come in a lot of sizes, but our design is one size fits all. Like Bum genious, our sewing design has a snap down adjustablilty. 
    • Typically no fold diaper soakers are sewn by serging the edges, but we have the option in our sewing pattern to use a regular sewing machine.   
    • The best fabric to use when sewing a no fold diaper soaker varies depending on your own preference.
      • For an every day soaker for a pocket diaper, use zorb and bamboo.
      • For an overnight soaker for a diaper use zorb and microterry or bamboo. 

ON TO THE FREE DIAPER INSERT SEWING PATTERNS

The following patterns are available for free download. Simply add to cart and check out. They'll be in your account for download whenever and however you choose!
While you are at it, check out our One Size Pocket Diaper sewing pattern. The Tri-fold, Duo-fold and Tongue diaper inserts fit perfectly in it!

Our favorite insert - Free One Size Diaper Insert Pattern & Tutorial (coming soon)

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